joplinpubliclibrary

Exhibit: PLACES I HAVE BEEN by Paula Giltner

We’ve resumed art exhibits in the library!

Now through November 30, 2020 Paula Giltner’s Places I Have Been is on exhibit in The Bramlage and Willcoxon Foundation Gallery and the Local History Room inside Joplin Public Library.

Places I Have Been features watercolor and oil paintings that take viewers to Colorado, Wyoming, California, and several Missouri locations, including Joplin.

Giltner is an award-winning artist who is part of Local Color Art Gallery in Joplin, Missouri. For more information, visit HERE. Click HERE for a news feature about this exhibit.

Artist’s Statement

If only I could show paintings of all the places I have been! Although I’m someone who has had very few dreams of traveling, my life events have taken me all over the globe. I have been to 48 states in the US and to 9 foreign countries.

Watercolor was the first medium to challenge me artistically. Eventually I experimented with acrylic and finally oil. What’s my favorite? That’s like choosing between steak and lobster. It’s all good, but in different ways.

I find that local people enjoy seeing paintings of familiar places around the four states. I love to paint the landscape in all seasons along with the wildlife, domestic life and architecture. I think the world is a beautiful place and there’s no place like home.

Paula Giltner | jnpgiltner@hotmail.com

Above: “Colorado Waterfall” by Paula Giltner
Above: “California 1” by Paula Giltner
Above: Places I Have Been Exhibition
The Bramlage and Willcoxon Foundation Gallery | Joplin Public Library

Paper-Mache Earring Workshop

We’re glad to partner with local artist Kristin Girard of Kristin’s Laboratory to offer a FREE Paper-Mache Earring Workshop–and just in time for Valentine’s Day!

During this hands-on workshop participants will learn the basics of paper-mache bead making with Jill Sullivan of Post Art Library and the basics of earring making with Kristin Girard of Kristin’s Laboratory.

After getting messy with paper, glue, and paint, participants will create a complete pair of paper-mache earrings to take home along with any other paper-mache beads they make during the program.

This is a FREE workshop, though space is limited and registration is necessary. Registration is open to the public, ages 16+, and spots are filled on a first come, first serve basis. Library card NOT needed. To register, call Jill Sullivan at 417-623-7953 x1041.

GRIND by Brett Dorrance

Brett Dorrance’s GRIND is comprised of a typographic sculpture and posters. Dorrance’s background knowledge of graphic design and 3D design is displayed in a pragmatic, modern, and uplifting way. He has a large interest in motivational messages and helping others from the bottom to the top. His desire is for the viewer to walk away with a sense of encouragement.

“We all go through a daily GRIND no matter what the circumstances are. I want that daily GRIND to be applied in a way that brings success and hope, not destruction or failure,” said Dorrance.

GRIND is on exhibit in The Bramlage and Willcoxon Foundation Gallery inside Joplin Public Library, 1901 East 20th Street, Joplin, MO now through January 5, 2019. An artist’s reception will be held in the gallery on Thursday, October 24, 2019 from 6-7:30pm. 

For more information, contact Jill Sullivan at 417-623-7953 x1041.

Photography by Maxwell Heckman

Maxwell Heckman’s photography show juxtaposes two of his series: M.A.D: Mutually Assured Destruction, a black and white series which opposes nuclear war and weapons, and Morning in Joplin, a color landscape series.

In his application to show artwork in the library, Maxwell Heckman described himself as “a young, somewhat inexperienced photographer.” He went on to say his philosophy is artists must enjoy their work, be proud of their failures, and, above all, keep going.

In his practice, he wakes at 5am and walks about with his camera, taking photos, whether it’s 5 degrees or 106, rain or shine, good or poor lighting, etc. He keeps going, shooting as many frames as he can, enjoying the process.

Rather than viewing his artwork as good or bad – “peeks or valleys” – he sees it as a vehicle for improvement, as “always having the opportunity to get better.” That, he says, is why he’s an artist.

When working with Maxwell to determine which of his work to show in the library, I became intrigued with juxtaposing his gas mask series and landscapes. The stark contrast between the black and white gas mask photographs and the saturated color landscapes demonstrates Maxwell’s aptitude for exploring his medium while eliciting an indescribable connection between the two series.

Indeed, he might be young and somewhat inexperienced, but his work is experimental and promising.

Heckman’s photography is on display in the Genealogy, Local History, and Post Reading Room wing inside Joplin Public Library now through November 30th.